About your Search

20100901
20100930
STATION
CSPAN 31
LANGUAGE
English 31
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
into agreements relating to education programs at the national zoological park facility in virginia and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentlewoman from california, mrs. davis, and the gentleman from california, mr. lungren, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the jovepl from california. mrs. davis: thank you. mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks in the record and include extraneous matter on this legislation. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mrs. davis: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. mrs. davis: h r. 5717 would upgrade the smithsonian institution's scientific activities at its unique facility, the smithsonian institute at fort royal, virginia. in the interest of time, i understand that there is consensus on this legislation, i will reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the gentleman from california. mr. lungren: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield
that with a guest from "the washington post." he also plans to meet with local families in richmond, virginia, and iowa, to talk about the economy, and do some more campaigning here at home and washington. on friday, a ceremony for justice elena kagan that the supreme court. speaking of the supreme court's newest justice, "usa today" reports that she first is -- faces the first supreme court test today. where with no law clerks are sectors present, to decide which cases to take up later how they should be resolved. and a first of the private sessions for the new term, which officially begins october 4, they will slip through thousands of appeals filed over the summer to decide which should be job -- granted hearings. the conference room is where all of the most and poor decisions of the most and poor decisions are made and they are made by the nine justices and no one else -- the most important decisions are made and they are made by the nine justices and no one else. many justices speak about how intimidating the first sessions can be. in hawaii justice anthony kennedy says the first confere
on the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from virginia seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i move to suspend the rules and pass s. 1132. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: senate 1132, an act to amend title 18 united states code to improve the provisions relating to carrying concealed weapons by law enforcement officers and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from virginia, mr. boucher, and the gentleman from texas, mr. poe, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from virginia. mr. boucher: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on the legislation now under consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. boucher: mr. speaker, i yield to myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for as much time as he may consume. mr. boucher: and i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker p
contested house races leading up to the mid term elections. >> i think virginia 11 is a sign of what's going on with the country, not just virginia. i think virginia was a sign in 2009 of some of the anger going up in the rest of the country. virginia 11 will move in the direction of whatever ways the couldn't arery is going, and the sign of whether a wave is building for republicans will definitely be seen if republicans win this race in november. >> how are you doing? you've got the wrong shirt on. >> i'm running for congress. never thought i'd do that, but we need people who can balance the budget in congress. >> who are the candidates in the 11th district. >> jer arery connally, -- jerry connally who was elected in 2008 -- gerry connelly, who was elected in 2008 and his opponent 2008. recently, the district has been shifting toward democrats. president obama won it, president bush took it by a slim 50% or 51% of the margin in 2004 and won it by a bigger margin in 2000. however in 2009, the last governor's race, bob mcdonald, who ran as a republican, took 55% in this district. so the ques
tomorrow afternoon, heading from iowa to virginia." with a theme throughout the papers this morning, divided government. a response to the president's weekly radio address yesterday, "can the two parties work together in the next congress"? for republicans, 202-737-0001. for democrats, 202-737-0002. for independents, 202-628-0205. yesterday from "the washington post," based on a weekly radio address and internet address yesterday -- host: also this morning, "politics and policy." host: we will get your phone calls in a moment, but first year is the president yesterday in his weekly address. >> many of the republican leaders were amongst the architects of the failed policy. grounded in the same moral philosophy, cut the taxes for millionaires and billionaires, cut the rules for wall street, cut loose the middle class to fend for itself. that is the echo of a disastrous decade that we cannot afford to relive. host: paul pearson has this, "cough up in the middle. what is a president who do"? "had the president realized earlier that he never could have won over corporate america, he nev
the stakes are. there is a patchwork across the country ranging from two states, kentucky and virginia that are meles disenfranchise everybody with a criminal conviction. if you are convicted of a felony when you are 18 years old, you lose the right to vote for life in the states. you can apply for clemency and ask the governor to restore your rights, and give to go through all application procedure and its at his discretion. he decides to get to vote in his state. not surprisingly, under some governors, that number drops precipitously. other -- under others, it goes up. it is purely discretionary and entirely under the governor's control. and the result of hundreds of thousands of people are disenfranchised. there is a disproportionate impact on people of color. one in four black men are disenfranchised in virginia because of this law. we are working to try to change that, but they're still two states that disenfranchise everybody with a criminal conviction. 10 states permit alley disenfranchise some people -- florida, alabama, mississippi, ariz. -- there are prominent disenfranchisem
troops in afghanistan. virginia, the plan, democrats line. go ahead. caller: i am from new york. shall i speak up? host: go ahead. caller: i think he should turn the page. it should have been turned a long time ago. but i do not think the media will let him because they just keep the war is going. let me say this because i tried so hard to get on to you -- george washington's farewell address. he answered many of the questions facing us. telling us we should be aware -- host: sorry, we will have to let you go. your signal is breaking up. here's more from the president last night. >> we must use all elements of all power, including our diplomacy, economic strength, and the power of america as an example to secure our interests and stand by our allies. and we must reject a vision of the future that is based not just on our fearless but also on our hopes. division that recognizes the real dangers that exist around the world but also the limitless possibilities of our time. today, old adversaries are at peace and emerging democracies are potential partners. new markets for our goods stretch
the gentleman from virginia rise? >> to address the house for one minute. revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. moran: mr. speaker, history is instructive on almost every issue we face in this body. today's issue is whether we should take action so that the wealthiest americans don't have to pay at an income tax rate of 39.6%. so let's look back at when they were taxed at that rate during the clinton administration. well, what happened was exactly the opposite of what the republican party predicted would happen. in fact, people at that rate brought home more after-tax income than any time in american history. 22 million new jobs were created and we had record budget surplusings. in fact, at the end -- surpluses. in fact, at the end of this month we were projected to have paid off all of the debt. relieving our children and grandchildren of any of the debt that we would have otherwise burdened them with. alan greenspan was worried we didn't have enough debt, but instead we had a president who came in and in fact one of the very first things he did was
the sound of the black hawk helicopter coming to land at the virginia detention center to take away. but it did not happen. i think a have a couple of additional points to make. number one, the key to doing this in the civilian system is the classified information procedures act. formerly of the eastern district of virginia and some other places as well, they think there is a well-settled practical application that permits the straws to occur in the civilian judicial system. -- permits these trials to occur in the civilian judicial stamsy. the manner in which we have done this has been developed through espionage cases and terrorism cases. you get clear defense council, like ed mcmahon here, a terrorism defendant who has no clearance, and it is unlike a typical the spinoff case and get access to classified material. finally, i would add that cps should be applied flexibly to prevent the trial of these kinds of cases. in the moussaoui case, that came to be applied in permitting substitute testimony for helvellyn -- held enemy combatants abroad. that was allowed to be submitted to the
of virginia vargas, james madison, the pink anies of south carolina. charles cokes worth and challs, king of massachusetts, zander hamilton of new york. benjamin franklin and thomas, robert morris of pennsylvania. morris of pennsylvania. and william patterson of new jersey. some of the names we still remember in history of signing the constitution. next telephone call fro charlotte, north carolina. good morning on this constitution day as we ask you whether or not you believe in original meaning or the living document. ivan, democrat's line. caller: let's take the original intent and work with that. because that is where the disagreement is. the reason why there's even a debate is because what is the founding philosophy that governs the constitution is the acquisition of property. the central focus of the constitution is a concern over properties. what makes this such -- what makes or gives this the character of a living document or original intent is the idea of slave enrichment slavery has 10 pro vigs and the most engrossed element of the constitution. they were concerned about establis
the gentleman from west virginia seek recognition. >> section permission to address the house for five minutes. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. mollohan: i call attention to an issue which threatens the economic viability of many industries and the existence of thousands of jobs in and around the coal fields of our nation. that issue, madam speaker, is the environmental protection agency's proposal to regulate coal ash as a hazardous material. over the past two years, madam speaker, the e.p.a. has peppered the federal government with the federal docket with a myriad of proposed rules and undertaken aggressive, zealous enforcement action targeted at industries in ap lashian -- ap latch chan states. that fuels this nation's energy needs. in its latest round of regulatory bravado, they imposed additional regulation on coal combustion products, fly ash. under subtitle c of the resource recovery and con servings act. i'm speaking today in opposition to the e.p.a.'s extreme and burdensome rule making options to regulate fly ash under subtitle c. this rule would unnecessarily jeopardi
for a tuesday showdown when there will be republican opposition. west virginia, next. west virginia, next. caller: i think stephen colbert is an american and he has a right to say what he wants to say. that is how the man gets his views across. host: the fact that he is a celebrity -- caller: why shouldn't he? we say what we want to said. why can he say what he wants to say? host: people talked about his qualifications and talking about this issue. caller: that is how he gets what you want to say across. if you watch his show, which i do, him and jon stewart bring things to the forefront. they do it in a comical way. many people don't get it. we are all going to get a lot of field jaws because republicans are leading us down that path. there is such a gap between poor people and rich people is that we will need those jobs and fighting immigrants for those jobs if large class people don't wake up and vote. wake up and vote. host: new york , our republican line per caller: good morning. celebritiesk that should be in position to make comments all over the place. i believe that we are in thi
across the country. it ranges from two states, kentucky and virginia, which partly disenfranchises anyone with a felony conviction. you lose the right to vote for life in their states. you can apply for clemency and ask the governor to restore your rights. you have to go to an application procedure. it is entirely at his discretion. he decides it is to vote in his state. under some governors, that number drops precipitously. it is purely discretionary. it is entirely within the governor's control. the result is hundreds of thousands of people are disenfranchised in the states. that has a disproportionate impact on communities of color. we have been working with our partners at the naacp and the and say it -- and the aclu to change that. the results or that two states still disenfranchised anyone with a felony conviction. it will not surprise you that florida, alabama, mississippi, and arizona have permanent disenfranchisement are at least some people with criminal convictions. there has been -- i want to talk about it -- the introduction to our report. a number of these laws are firmly ro
. had he been in the eastern division of virginia and convicted of those same offenses, i suspect he could be doing 20 to life. the sentence would have been completely different. it's ironic when you look at the outcome of the few cases that have been through the military system and compare them to the outcomes in our court. i have many, many defendant who are serving many sentences in cases that didn't involve actual violence other than they were shooting r.p.g.s or other dangerous weapons over in pakistan. it's interesting when you think about it. i think the perception of the two systems have become warped. no terrorism defendant in the modern times ever got a death sentence either. the embassy bombing there's not been that when he's fighting against the tide. >> someone acquited a trial a civilian or military trial could still be detain on a military rationale. there are supreme court precedents that say there's no due process for detaining someone after acquital. if there's an independent bases for danger or something like that. i don't believe in any of those cases the executiv
one -- virginia and maryland. then you have democrats that face tougher calls. chett edwards faces a tough race. these are members represent conservative districts. this may not be the year for them to save their seats. host: what will be the game plan for the white house to save the majority in the house? guest: to be very cold-blooded in their a look and where they need to invest in these races. decide where their money can make a difference. host: will the president be campaigning for individual candidates? will he stay clear and fund- raiser for them instead? what will he do? guest: i think you'll see president obama heading up the new york checkbox pretty soon. he will head up the los angeles checkbox. -- checkbooks. many of the conservative democrats -- and democrats in conservative districts, do not want to have the present campaign for them. the individualize their races. the distance themselves from the national party. host: the first lady is going to spend some of her political capital and carefully stepped into the campaign season. where do you expect to see her? guest:
massachusetts and virginia did not work out so well earlier this year. did you learn any lessons, how do you apply them, going forward? >> i am not sure that they did not work out so well. we got started late in both places. when we do mobilization, there is nobody that does it better. we have the biggest political program, ability to mobilize workers. race after race, you see that our members get energized and we can get them up to the polls. we started early enough, we are not getting into the game late, as perhaps we did in massachusetts and virginia, frankly. we will be supporting candidates who support working people, that have their record to stand on. >> other questions? >> "washington post." i wonder if you could talk about the tv ad that is coming up this weekend. this is an opportunity to inform the voters. >> this is labor day, the funding through the working people are. that is what the ad does. it says a couple of things. workers built the country, they make it run, they defend it, and we are going to work together, rather than polarizing groups. it is an attempt to define us fo
lieutenant in the u.s. army in 1902, following his graduation from the virginia military institute. he quickly rose through the ranks and was appointed chief of staff of the army in 1939 by president frankly roosevelt. marshall inherited an army on the cusp of a second world war and oversaw the largest military expansion in u.s. history. in 1944, he became the first american general to be promoted to a five-star rank. the newly created general of the army. marshall resigned his post of chief of staff of the army in 1945 and devoted himself to international security and peace. between 1945 and 1946 he served as the envoy for president truman in china to peacefully resolve a conflict between the nationalists and the communists. president truman appointed him as secretary of state in 1947 where he oversaw the marshall plan, the $13 billion economic recovery plan that was instrumental in the rebuilding of europe. for his efforts, marshall seen the nobel peace prize. he retired from the state department in 1949 and became the president of the american red cross. in 1950 president truman app
in illinois, west virginia and delaware will take office more or less immediately after votes are canvased and certified and they'll be serving in the lame-duck session. i believe that voters in those states will render a very clear judgment on this lame duck agenda by sending additional reinforcements for our side of the aisle. the campaign strategy of our friends on the other side of the aisle is crystal clear. they are not running on their legislative accomplishments because it's largely unpopular. and they are worried that voters will hold them accountable for the failure of those policies to meet their own stated goals. so they're running campaigns against the american people, some of whom are participating in the political process for the first time. and i'm talking about the tea party movement. calling some of these participants in the process guaranteed by the first amendment of the constitution to redress their government on their grievances and they're deemonizing members of the tea party -- demonizing members of the tea party movement. and president obama has engaged in class wa
done. historic elections in the state of virginia and new jersey and the state formally known as massachusetts has a republican member of the united states senate. [applause] to these conservative victories we have when harry met shelly playing in nevada. joe the senator in alaska, delaware is about to send conservative to the united states senate as well. [applause] as we say, on highway 40 where i grew up, who'd have thunk it? even republicans in congress have gotten back to fiscal discipline and conservative values. let's be honest, four years ago republicans in congress did not just lose their majority. they lost breakaway. -- they lost their way. when i opposed the wall street bailout, i told my colleagues the american people would eventually go with the professionals if we kept acting like liberals. sadly, they did. the truth is our party in congress walk away from the principles that minted our national governing majority. if the american people walked away from that. house republicans, have they learned their lesson? people ask me that. after a year that saw every sing
. alexandria, virginia. democrats line. you are on. go ahead, please. ellis, speak up or we have to move on. caller: i am speaking up. host: what do you have to say? caller: nobody should be too big to fail. host: de have anything more to add? caller: the reason i think these people should be allowed to fail is because already the government has already bailed them out. and at this point, we are still working on bailing them out, yet they don't seem to be helping anybody else out here in this economy right now. and they are actively lobbying right now in congress to try to get to -- republicans get back to office. part of this deal. it is all partisan. and it is all about politics. and what is going to come down to in the end is they say they don't want it to be failing -- ok, the republicans don't, but yet the democrats are saying they are trying to restrict this now so nobody can be too big to fail. and what we will end up is these big companies are going to get their money back, they will all buy into their way and they will -- obviously what we are looking at, where we were before. then
representing virginia. thank you for joining us. guest: vermont. host: did i say virginia? excuse me. huge difference. you are having a meeting with senator dick durbin and the fed chairman ben bernanke to talk about the implementation. tell me about your meeting. guest: the rulemaking process by which we are going to implement the credit card provisions that were in the wall street reform act. the chairman has met with a visa and master card, the fed has met with the big banks. and senator dick durbin and i, the principal authors of the credit card reform provisions in the wall street though, want to meet on behalf of consumers and merchants. basically what the wall street reform bill did with credit cards is try to help our merchants, who were getting hammered with the highest credit card transaction fees in the world. they pay about $50 billion a year. a lot of folks don't know this, but if you go and use your credit card -- of course, they are important and good for the economy. a secure transaction for the merchant. good for the consumer. but the charges that the monopolies impose are
that is from tuesday. virginia. brian, republican. go ahead. caller: first-time caller. i would like to comment a little bit about congress. i have listened to a couple of the comments made this morning. the problem we have right now is that republicans and democrats cannot get together on any issue that we have relating to this country. it is a shame that they can't do that. and i think that this health care reform that they have passed, that the democrats have passed, has really affected our country and has affected me also as a citizen. it because i am a police officer. -- because i am a police officer, and just this year alone might premiums, ever since they passed the health care plan, my premiums have gone up twice. actually talking about going up again in -- where it. costs -- going up begin in january. this is the biggest reason premiums i have never had and i have been a lot enforcement 22 years. it's, you work for the city? is it -- host: do you work for the city? is it the city paying less or the premiums going up to the cause has increased to both? caller: well, the blue cross and b
a number of international conferences that we found it at the university of iowa. the virginia tech research, and the second international conference on driver distraction and attention. the scientific community is really getting much more diverse in this topic, as well as reported on these for many different conferences as well. when you start to take a look at the kinds of tools that will use in research, those are also devolving our jobs as scientists is really to paint a picture, sometimes it is clear what the picture is made up, other times it is very fuzzy. we have very tightly controlled laboratory research from scanners that can tell us exactly how the brain changes under different kinds of attention demand. we use simulators with the national advance driving simulator. we use field experiments. finally, crashed in epidemiology data to understand how these kinds of mechanisms work. along this continuant we have the basic research that has experimental control where we can ask very specific questions and get fairly unambiguous results to understand the underlying mechanisms.
. this is wre democrats did well in the last two cycles. we saw this in northern virginia, suburbs outside philadelphia, outside of las vegas and phoenix, even, this is where democrats we able to win over voters with a common sense kind of agenda, practic approach to making the middle- class better. what we found is a lot of residents there are falling on tough times and switching their loyalties. they are not necessarily tea party people, so they are not angry -- i talked to about two dozen residents of the subdivision who were political independents, and they did not say anything hateful about the president or that they were voting the tea party but they were critical of the president. it's good he said they were not tea party identifiers. -- host: yu said that they are concerned about everyday issues that affect their lives. how important of the suburbs or this area of this country -- not urban america or rural america, more of a middle-class enclave. guest: it is critical for both parties. it is where the growth is. not necessarily the closed in suburbs that have been established for a
elections in the state of virginia and new jersey and the state formally known as massachusetts has a republican member of the united states senate. [applause] to these conservative victories we have when harry met shelly playing in nevada. joe the senator in alaska, delaware is about to send conservative to the united states senate as well. [applause] as we say, on highway 40 where i it? up, who'd have thunk even republicans in congress have gotten back to fiscal discipline and conservative values. agos be honest, four years republicans in congress did not just lose their majority. they lost breakaway. lost their way. when i opposed the wall street bailout, i told my colleagues the american people would eventually go with the professionals if we kept acting like liberals. sadly, they did. the truth is our party in congress walk away from the principles that minted our national governing majority. if the american people walked away from that. house republicans, have they learned their lesson? people ask me that. after a year that saw every single house republican vote against the ph
. parts of virginia are starting to feel -- the category two storm churned past north carolina's outer banks. officials say they'll be assessing the damages this morning. but forecasters say earl produced little storm surge and minor flooding. the jobless rate is expected to increase to .6% from 9.5%. that would be the first rise since april. bp says so far its spent $8 million responding to the oil spill cleanup. $399 million paid to settle hundreds of thousands of claims from businesses andors act affected by the 13il8. and seeing evidence that the -- today secretary gates visited troops who are in the thick of fighting in that taliban strong hold, and finally a government official says a scientist has official says a scientist has been detained in miami after screeners found a metal canister in his luggage that looked like a pipe bomb. the f.b.i. and miami-dade police are interviewing the 70-year-old man. no explosives have been found. four of miami international airports and concourses were evacuated thursday night. but the airport fully re-opened just after 4:00 a.m. this morning.
's election on "washington journal." and labor joint forces command headquartered in norfolk, virginia. goverage begins at 10 -- coverage begins at 10:00 eastern. later, ed miliband will speak at his party's conference in england. gordon brown steps down after labour lost. >> whether poking fun or dealing with more serious issues, celebrities have often spoken in congress. search for names you might know any time. >> coming up, interior secretary ken salazar talks about the recent oil spill. he testified at the national commission on the bp oil spill yesterday. this is just over an hour. very pleased to see you here this afternoon and we know you have been vigorously addressing problems of the sort we have been investigating. we have turned to the government today as the focus of our inquiry and look forward with great enthusiasm to your presentation. thank you, sir. >> thank you very much. thank you to each of the members of the commission. thank you for your service to the country and your service on this commission as we move forward to understand what caused the explosion at the de
first call comes from richmond, virginia. randy on our line for republicans. caller: i have a question -- or a common. -- comment. i wanted to give you a personal compliments on your last segment. you were very professional -- not just cracking of about the planets alignments on september 50. host: thank you a lot. thank you for your questions or comments. caller: i saw on msnbc about the secretary of labor was talking about the large portion of money being invested in this high tech training. doing some investments there. i work in a very high tech field and i have been unemployed for over eight months. i have plenty of security. my question is, how do you think that will trace how those funds will help of the lower income, or as you were saying, just high-school educated person in the workforce? i believe it would be a good step, but it will not help anything in the here and now to get any kind of education in the high-tech industry -- you at least need a four-year degree. guest: that is true. if you are looking in the high- tech industry in particular, most of those jobs to require
that chinese currency is undervalued. it is a problem. it affect it is ohio virginia. it's a source of great frustration for many years i've experienced in manufacturing. and where people disagree is how we should respond. and there's a number of paths. certainly the ryan-murphy bill is one approach. there are other that is are offered. how effective do you think unilateral u.s. action would be such as tear yiffs in enforcing the chinese to appreciate their currency? particularly considering some of the wto conversations? >> i think for any action to be effective it has to be able to withstand challenge. that doesn't mean we have no independent capacity to act. there are tools we have that are fully consistent with the wto. and our agreements with china. and i think that where those tools can be effective, we should be prepared to use them as we are. the critical test is whether they can withstand challenge. and there are a range of things we have the capacity to do that meet that test. as i mentioned in my testimony. >> thank you. and finally, the one thing that i noticed from quiet diploma
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)